Talk at The Jackson Laboratory: “How to see a ghost, think like a molecule, and write like a scientist”

I finally have a reasonably good filmed version of the talk I’ve been giving around Europe and the US, thanks to my hosts at the Jackson Laboratory in Bar Harbor Maine. This talk was given on June 5, 2019, and scratches the surface of a “new model of the relationship between science and communication,” which I have written about in detail on previous posts, for example

https://goodsciencewriting.wordpress.com/2018/03/25/a-dialog-on-ghosts-and-models-in-science/

https://goodsciencewriting.wordpress.com/2018/03/11/ghosts-models-and-meaning-in-science/

and

https://goodsciencewriting.wordpress.com/2019/03/19/ghosts-in-scientific-images-and-narratives/

This approach has fundamentally changed the way I think about science communication and has, I think, profound implications for teaching and learning science, communicating it to a wide public, and even improving the quality of research.

The talk can always be improved, and I am still collecting examples… All feedback would be greatly appreciated.

 

Published by

russhodge

I am a science writer at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in Berlin, author of fiction and popular science books, an artist, and a professional musician who performs on the viola da gamba and Medieval and Renaissance stringed instruments. I edit manuscripts of all types and teach the full range of scientific communication skills. I am doing theoretical work in this subject - see for example https://goodsciencewriting.wordpress.com/2018/03/11/ghosts-models-and-meaning-in-science/

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